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Memorandum D11-4-2

Ottawa, March 16, 2006

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In Brief

Proof of Origin

Memorandum D11-4-2, Proof of Origin, has been revised to include references to the Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement (CCRFTA), to reflect recent amendments to the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement (CIFTA) and to set out technical rectifications to subsections 4(2) and 4(3) of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations. Changes have also been made to the “Guidelines and General Information” section to clarify policy or procedural issues that have arisen since the last revision to this Memorandum.

This Memorandum contains the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations that apply to all tariff treatments accorded to imported goods and outlines the guidelines regarding the proof of origin requirements for those tariff treatments.

Table of Contents


Legislation

Origin of Goods

35.1 (1) Subject to any regulations made under subsection (4), proof of origin, in the prescribed form containing the prescribed information and containing or accompanied by the information, statements or proof required by any regulations made under subsection (4), shall be furnished in respect of all goods that are imported.

(2) Proof of origin of goods shall be furnished under subsection (1) to an officer at such time and place and in such manner as may be prescribed.

(3) Subject to any regulations made under subsection (4), proof of origin of goods shall be furnished under subsection (1) by the importer or owner thereof.

(4) The Governor in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister and the Minister of Finance, may make regulations

  • (a) specifying persons or classes of persons who are authorized to furnish proof of origin of goods under subsection (1) in lieu of the importer or owner thereof and prescribing the circumstances in which and the conditions, if any, under which such persons or classes of persons are so authorized;
  • (b) specifying information required to be contained in, or to accompany, the prescribed proof of origin form in addition to the prescribed information and specifying any statements or proof required to be contained therein or to accompany that form; and
  • (c) exempting persons or goods, or classes thereof, from the requirements of subsection (1) subject to such conditions, if any, as are specified in the regulations.

(5) Preferential tariff treatment under a free trade agreement may be denied or withdrawn in respect of goods for which that treatment is claimed if the importer, owner, or other person required to furnish proof of origin of the goods under this section fails to comply with any provision of this Act or the Customs Tariff, or any regulation made under either of those Acts, concerning that preferential tariff treatment.

Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations

Interpretation

1. The definitions in this section apply in these Regulations.

“Act”

means the Customs Act. (Loi)

“alteration”

means a modification, other than a repair, that does not include an operation or process that either destroys the essential characteristics of a good or creates a new or commercially different good. (modification)

“casual goods”

means goods imported into Canada, other than commercial goods. (marchandises occasionnelles)

“commercial goods”

means goods imported into Canada for sale or for any industrial, occupational, commercial, institutional or other like use. (marchandises commerciales)

“identical goods”

means goods that are the same in all respects, including physical characteristics, quality and reputation, except for minor differences in appearance that do not affect the determination of origin of those goods. (marchandises identiques)

“minor processing”

means, with respect to a good,

  • (a) mere dilution with water or any other substance that does not materially alter the characteristics of the good;
  • (b) cleaning, including removal of rust, grease, paint or any other coating;
  • (c) applying any preservative or decorative coating, including any lubricant, protective encapsulation, preservative or decorative paint, or metallic coating;
  • (d) trimming, filing or cutting off small amounts of excess material;
  • (e) packing or repacking of the good for transport, storage or sale;
  • (f) packaging or repackaging of the good for retail sale or relabelling of the good in one or more official languages of a Party to CIFTA; or
  • (g) repairs or alterations, washing, laundering or sterilizing. (traitement mineur)
“repair”

means the adjustment of a machine, instrument, electrical device or other article, including replacing or refitting of parts to restore the article to its original operating condition (réparation)

“series of importations”

means two or more importations of goods that are accounted for separately under section 32 of the Act, but that are covered by one commercial invoice issued by the vendor of the goods to the purchaser of the goods. (série d’importations)

“transaction value”

means the price actually paid or payable for the good or material with respect to the transaction between the producer of the good and the buyer of the good or the seller of the material, respectively, adjusted in accordance with paragraphs 1, 3 and 4 of Article 8 of the Customs Valuation Code as defined in section 1 of the CIFTA Rules of Origin Regulations. (valeur transactionnelle)

“United States”

means

  • (a) the customs territory of the United States, the 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico;
  • (b) the foreign trade zones located in the United States and Puerto Rico; and
  • (c) any areas beyond the territorial seas of the United States within which, in accordance with international law and its domestic law, the United States may exercise rights with respect to the seabed and subsoil and their natural resources. (États-Unis)

2. Wherever in these Regulations a reference is made to a particular tariff or tariff treatment, that reference shall be construed to mean that tariff or tariff treatment in the List of Tariff Provisions set out in the schedule to the Customs Tariff.

3. For the purposes of subsections 4(2) to (5) and 5(2) and (3), any person or class of persons authorized to account for goods under regulations made pursuant to paragraph 32(6)(a)of the Act is authorized to furnish proof of origin of goods under subsection 35.1(1) of the Act in lieu of the importer or owner thereof.

Proof of Origin of Goods From Countries that are Beneficiaries of the General Preferential Tariff, Commonwealth Caribbean Countries Tariff or Least Developed Country Tariff

4. (1) For the purposes of this section, “beneficiary country” means a country the goods of which have been extended the benefit of the General Preferential Tariff, Commonwealth Caribbean Countries Tariff or Least Developed Country Tariff.

(2) Subject to subsections (3) to (5), where the benefit of the General Preferential Tariff, Commonwealth Caribbean Countries Tariff or Least Developed Country Tariff is claimed for goods, the importer or owner of the goods shall, for the purposes of section 35.1 of the Act, furnish to an officer, as proof of origin, at the time set out in section 13, the prescribed form completed in English or French and signed by the exporter in the beneficiary country.

(3) The importer and owner of goods that originate in a beneficiary country are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act, if the importer or owner

  • (a) furnishes to an officer, at the times set out in section 13, an exporter’s statement of origin in the form set out in the schedule, completed in English or French and signed by the exporter in the beneficiary country; or
  • (b) declares to an officer in writing, at the time set out in paragraph 13(a), that it has in its possession
    • (i) the completed and signed prescribed form referred to in subsection (2), or
    • (ii) an exporter’s statement of origin referred in paragraph (a).

(4) The importer and owner of casual goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if

  • (a) there is no evidence that the goods originate in a country other than a beneficiary country;
  • (b) the goods are imported in a traveller's baggage or consigned from an individual in the beneficiary country to an individual in Canada; and
  • (c) the goods are declared at the time of importation as not intended for resale.

(5) Where the benefit of the General Preferential Tariff is claimed for commercial goods that originate in the People’s Republic of China and the goods are shipped from Hong Kong on a through bill of lading to a consignee in Canada, the importer and owner of those goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if the importer or owner furnishes to an officer, at the times set out in section 13, a document that is completed in English or French and signed by the exporter in Hong Kong or the producer in the People’s Republic of China, and that indicates that at least 60 per cent of the ex-factory price of the goods is attributable to production in the People’s Republic of China.

Proof of Origin of Goods From Countries that are Beneficiaries of the Most-Favoured-Nation Tariff, Australia Tariff or New Zealand Tariff

5. (1) For the purposes of this section, “beneficiary country” means a country the goods of which have been extended the benefit of the Most-Favoured-Nation Tariff, Australia Tariff or New Zealand Tariff.

(2) Subject to subsection (3), where the benefit of the Most-Favoured-Nation Tariff, Australia Tariff or New Zealand Tariff is claimed for goods, the importer or owner of the goods shall, for the purposes of section 35.1 of the Act, furnish to an officer, as proof of origin, at the times set out in section 13, the prescribed form, completed in English or French by the vendor or the transferee in the country of export.

(3) The importer and owner of the goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if the importer or owner furnishes to an officer, at the times set out in section 13,

  • (a) a Canada Customs invoice, completed in English or French by the importer or owner that indicates that the goods originate in the applicable beneficiary country;
  • (b) where the Canada Customs invoice does not indicate that the goods originate in the applicable beneficiary country, a commercial invoice, completed in English or French by the vendor or the transferee in the country of export, that indicates that the goods originate in the applicable beneficiary country; or
  • (c) any other documentation, completed in English or French, that indicates that the goods originate in the applicable beneficiary country.

Proof of Origin of Goods that are Entitled to the Benefit of Preferential Tariff Treatment Under NAFTA, CCFTA or CCRFTA

6. (1) Subject to subsections (2) to (4), where the benefit of preferential tariff treatment under NAFTA, CCFTA or CCRFTA is claimed for goods, the importer or owner of the goods shall, for the purposes of section 35.1 of the Act, furnish to an officer, as proof of origin, at the times set out in section 13, a Certificate of Origin for the goods, completed in English, French or Spanish.

(2) The importer and owner of the goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if the importer or owner furnishes to an officer, at the time prescribed by paragraph 13(a), a written and signed declaration, in English or French, that certifies that the goods originate in the applicable NAFTA country, in Chile or in Costa Rica, as the case may be, and that the completed Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection (1) is in the importer’s possession.

(3) Where the benefit of preferential tariff treatment under NAFTA, CCFTA or CCRFTA is claimed for casual goods, the importer and owner of the casual goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if the casual goods are entitled to preferential tariff treatment under NAFTA pursuant to the NAFTA Rules of Origin for Casual Goods Regulations, preferential tariff treatment under CCFTA pursuant to the CCFTA Rules of Origin for Casual Goods Regulations, or preferential tariff treatment under CCRFTA pursuant to the CCRFTA Rules of Origin for Casual Goods Regulations, as the case may be.

(4) Where the benefit of preferential tariff treatment under NAFTA, CCFTA or CCRFTA is claimed for commercial goods that have an estimated value for duty of less than $1,600, the importer and owner of the commercial goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if

  • (a) the commercial goods do not form part of a series of importations that is undertaken or arranged for the purpose of avoiding the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act; and
  • (b) the importer or owner of the commercial goods furnishes to an officer, at the times set out in section 13,
    • (i) a commercial invoice for the commercial goods, containing a written and signed statement, in English or French, from the exporter or producer of the commercial goods, that certifies that the commercial goods originate in the applicable NAFTA country, Chile or Costa Rica, as the case may be, or
    • (ii) a written and signed statement, in English or French, from the exporter or producer of the commercial goods, that certifies that the commercial goods originate in the applicable NAFTA country, Chile or Costa Rica, as the case may be.

7. Where the Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection 6(1) is completed in Spanish, the importer or owner of the goods shall, at the request of an officer, furnish to the officer a translation of the Certificate of Origin in English or French.

8. The Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection 6(1) may apply in respect of

  • (a) a single importation of a good; or
  • (b) two or more importations of identical goods, imported by the same importer, that occur within a period not exceeding 12 months, as set out in the Certificate of Origin by the person signing it.

9. The Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection 6(1) may be accepted as proof of origin for four years after the date on which it was signed.

Proof of Origin of Goods that are Entitled to the Benefit of Preferential Tariff Treatment Under CIFTA

10. (1) Subject to subsections (1.1) to (4), where the benefit of preferential tariff treatment under CIFTA is claimed for goods, the importer or owner of the goods shall, for the purposes of section 35.1 of the Act, furnish to an officer, as proof of origin, at the times set out in section 13, a Certificate of Origin for the goods, completed in English, French, Hebrew or Arabic.

(1.1) Where goods, except for goods listed in any of Chapters 50 through 63 of the List of Tariff Provisions set out in the schedule to the Customs Tariff, are shipped to Canada from Israel or another CIFTA beneficiary through the United States, a Declaration of Minor Processing, as prescribed by the Minister, completed in English or French and signed by the exporter in the United States, shall accompany the Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection (1) if

  • (a) the goods do not undergo further production in the United States other than minor processing; or
  • (b) any processing that occurs in the United States does not increase the transaction value of the goods by greater than 10%.

(2) The importer and owner of the goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if the importer or owner furnishes to an officer, at the time set out in paragraph 13(a), a written and signed declaration, in English or French, that certifies that the goods originate in Israel or another CIFTA beneficiary and that the completed Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection (1) and, if applicable, the completed Declaration of Minor Processing referred to in subsection (1.1) are in the importer’s possession.

(3) Where the benefit of preferential tariff treatment under CIFTA is claimed for casual goods acquired in Israel or another CIFTA beneficiary, the importer and owner of the casual goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if the casual goods are entitled to preferential tariff treatment under CIFTA pursuant to the CIFTA Rules of Origin for Casual Goods Regulations.

(4) Where the benefit of preferential tariff treatment under CIFTA is claimed for commercial goods whose estimated value for duty does not exceed $1,600, the importer and owner of the commercial goods are exempt from the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act if

  • (a) the commercial goods do not form part of a series of importations that is undertaken or arranged for the purpose of avoiding the requirements of subsection 35.1(1) of the Act; and
  • (b) the importer or owner of the commercial goods furnishes to an officer, at the times set out in section 13,
    • (i) a commercial invoice for the commercial goods, containing a written and signed statement by the exporter, in English or French, that certifies that the commercial goods originate in Israel or another CIFTA beneficiary, or
    • (ii) a written and signed statement by the exporter, in English or French, that certifies that the commercial goods originate in Israel or another CIFTA beneficiary.

11. Where the Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection 10(1) is completed in Hebrew or Arabic, the importer or owner of the goods shall, at the request of an officer, furnish to the officer a translation of the Certificate of Origin in English or French.

12. The Certificate of Origin referred to in subsection 10(1) may apply in respect of

  • (a) a single importation of a good; or
  • (b) two or more importations of identical goods, imported by the same importer, that occur within a period not exceeding 12 months, as set out in the Certificate of Origin by the exporter who signed it.

Time

13. Proof of origin for goods accounted for under section 32 of the Act on or after January 1, 1998 shall be furnished at the following times:

  • (a) at any time the goods are accounted for under subsection 32(1), (3) or (5) of the Act;
  • (b) at the time an application for a refund in respect of the origin of goods is made under section 74 of the Act; and
  • (c) at any time when requested by an officer.

Schedule

(Subsections 4(2) and (3))

Exporter's Statement of Origin

I certify that the goods described in this invoice or in the attached invoice #               were produced in the beneficiary country of                 and that at least                 per cent of the ex-factory price of the goods originates in the beneficiary country/countries of                .

                              

Name and title

                              

Corporation name and address

                              

Telephone and fax numbers

                              

Signature and date (day/month/year)


Guidelines and General Information

General

1. Pursuant to section 35.1 of the Customs Act proof of origin must be furnished for all imported goods.

2. Proof of origin may be in the form of a commercial invoice, a Form CI1 Canada Customs Invoice, a Form A Certificate of Origin, an Exporter’s Statement of Origin, a Certificate of Origin or any other documentation that indicates the country of origin of the goods.

3. With the exception of the General Tariff, each tariff treatment requires specific proof of origin as set out in regulations. A summary of the proof of origin requirements by tariff treatments is set out in Chart 1, while examples of proof origin are set out in Appendices A through J.

Times for Proof of Origin Presentation

4. As set out in section 13 of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations, proof of origin is to be presented at the time of accounting, when applying for a refund or at any time when requested by an officer.

Records

5. The proof of origin and all other relevant documents related to the importation of commercial goods must be retained by importers for six years as set out in Memorandum D17-1-21, Maintenance of Records and Books in Canada by Importers.

False Declarations

6. Making or assenting to make a false declaration in a statement made verbally or in writing to the Canada Border Services Agency is an offence under section 153 of the Customs Act and is subject to sanctions under section 160 of that Act. Therefore, importers who declare falsely that they are in possession of proof of origin for the goods in question or who claim a preferential tariff treatment based on that false declaration are in contravention of section 153 of the Customs Act and are liable to sanctions under section 160 of the same Act.

7. In the case of importations under free trade agreements, no offence is considered to be committed under section 160 of the Act when a person corrects a declaration of origin within 90 days of having reason to believe that the Certificate of Origin may contain incorrect information.

8. For further information concerning corrections to the declaration of origin, refer to Memorandum D11-6-6, Self-Adjustments to Declarations of Origin, Tariff Classification, Value for Duty, and Diversion of Goods.

Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS)

9. Where proof of origin is not presented upon request in accordance with section 13(c) of the regulations, an officer may apply AMP penalty C152. Further information regarding AMPS can be found in Memorandum D22-1-1, Administrative Monetary Penalty System.

Proof of Origin: Non-Free Trade Agreements

General Tariff (GT)

10. Proof of origin for GT tariff treatment must be in the form of a commercial invoice or Form CI1, Canada Customs Invoice (Appendix A) prepared by the vendor indicating the country of origin of the goods, or any other documentation indicating the country of origin of the goods.

Most-Favoured-Nation Tariff (MFN)

11. Proof of origin for MFN tariff treatment must be in the form of a commercial invoice or Form CI1, Canada Customs Invoice prepared by the vendor indicating the country of origin of the goods, or any other documentation indicating the country of origin of the goods.

12. Further information about importing under the MFN can be found in Memorandum D11-4-3, Rules of Origin Respecting the Most-Favoured-Nation Tariff.

General Preferential Tariff (GPT)

13. For all originating goods from GPT beneficiary countries, a Form A – Certificate of Origin (Appendix B) or the Exporter’s Statement of Origin (Appendix C) must be submitted as proof of origin. Such proof of origin must be completed and signed by the exporter of the goods located in the GPT country in which the goods were finished prior to importation into Canada.

14. Further information about importing under the GPT can be found in Memorandum D11-4-4, Rules of Origin Respecting the General Preferential Tariff and Least Developed Country Tariff.

Least Developed Country Tariff (LDCT)

15. For all originating goods from LDC beneficiary countries, a Form A – Certificate of Origin or the Exporter’s Statement of Origin must be submitted as proof of origin. Such proof of origin must be completed and signed by the exporter of the goods located in the LDCT country in which the goods were finished prior to importation into Canada.

16. Further information about importing under the LDCT can be found in Memorandum D11-4-4, Rules of Origin Respecting the General Preferential Tariff and Least Developed Country Tariff.

Commonwealth Caribbean Countries Tariff (CCCT)

17. For all originating goods from CCCT beneficiary countries, Form A – Certificate of Origin or the Exporter’s Statement of Origin must be submitted as proof of origin. Such proof of origin must be completed and signed by the exporter of the goods located in the CCCT country in which the goods were finished prior to importation into Canada.

18. Further information about importing under the CCCT can be found in Memorandum D11-4-5, Rules of Origin Respecting CARIBCAN.

Australia Tariff (AUT) and New Zealand Tariff (NZT)

19. Proof of origin for the AUT and NZT treatment must be presented in the form of a commercial invoice or Form CI1, Canada Customs Invoice, prepared by the vendor, or any other documentation indicating the country of origin of the goods as Australia or New Zealand as the case may be.

20. Further information about importing under the AUT or the NZT can be found in Memorandum D11-4-6, Rules of Origin for the New Zealand and Australia Tariff.

Proof of Origin: Free Trade Agreements

General

21. Sections 6 to 9 (CCFTA, CCRFTA and NAFTA) and 10 to 12 (CIFTA) of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations set forth the requirements for the proof of origin of goods imported from a free trade partner.

22. To benefit from the preferential tariff treatment provided for under a specific free trade agreement the importer must provide, as proof of origin, either a copy of the certificate of origin required for that agreement completed and signed by the exporter, or a written declaration (i.e., the completed and signed customs accounting documents) which indicates that the relevant certificate of origin is in the importer’s possession and will be presented upon request (Appendices D through G). If the certificate has been completed in a language other than English or French, the importer may be requested to have it translated into either of those languages.

23. Only those officials who have the legally vested authority to sign on behalf of a company, or who have sufficient knowledge of the origin of the goods may sign a certificate. If a third party has completed and signed the certificate on behalf of the exporter or producer, that third party must have knowledge of the origin of the goods. All parties must be able to demonstrate to the satisfaction of customs authorities that the signing party has the legal authority (such as power of attorney) to prepare and sign the certificate.

24. The certificate of origin attests that the goods in question meet the rules of origin of a specific agreement. The certificate covers any goods that qualify as originating under the rules of origin regardless of whether the goods are new, old, used, or unused. For further information, refer to the rules of origin for the specific free trade agreement as found in the Memoranda D11-5 series.

25. For further clarification, the preferential tariff treatments under NAFTA are the United States Tariff (UST), the Mexico Tariff (MT) and the Mexico-United States Tariff (MUST). The preferential tariff treatment under the CIFTA is the Canada-Israel Agreement Tariff (CIAT), the preferential tariff treatment under the CCFTA is the Chile Tariff (CT) and the preferential tariff treatment under the CCRFTA is the Costa Rica Tariff (CRT).

26. The proof of origin must be presented in accordance with paragraph 13 of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations. A certificate does not have to be presented at the time of release or accounting but must be presented upon request. If it is not in the importer's possession at the time of accounting, another appropriate tariff, usually the Most-Favoured-Nation Tariff, is to be claimed.

27. For the purpose of NAFTA, CCFTA and CCRFTA, a certificate of origin completed and signed by an exporter or producer will be accepted as proof of origin for four years after the date on which it is signed, for:

  • (a) a single importation of goods, or
  • (b) multiple importations of identical goods within a 12-month period (i.e. blanket certificate).

28. For the purpose of CIFTA, a certificate of origin completed and signed by the exporter will be accepted as proof of origin for:

  • (a) a single importation of goods, or
  • (b) multiple importations of identical goods within a 12-month period (i.e. blanket certificate).

29. Under the CCRFTA certain goods, although originating in accordance with the CCRFTA rules of origin, are deemed not to originate where such goods have undergone operations in geographic areas that benefit from the Costa Rica Free Zone Regime. Exporters in Costa Rica must indicate in Fields 1 and 3 of the CCRFTA certificate of origin if they have benefited from the free zone regime. Further information concerning the free zone regimes can be found in Memorandum D11-4-27, Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement (CCRFTA) Free Zone Regimes.

30. When CIFTA originating goods, except for goods of HS Chapters 50-63, have entered into the territory of the United States for minor processing or for any processing that does not increase the transaction value of the goods by greater than 10 %, an importer must also provide, as proof of origin, a Form E669, Declaration of Minor Processing in the United States (CIFTA), completed and signed by the exporter in the United States (Appendix H).

Casual Goods

31. Subsections 6(3) (NAFTA, CCFTA and CCRFTA) and 10(3) (CIFTA) of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations provides that casual goods acquired in a free trade territory are exempt from the proof of origin requirements outlined in this Memorandum, where the casual goods are entitled to the benefit of a preferential tariff treatment pursuant to the appropriate Rules of Origin for Casual Goods Regulations. The origin of casual goods is based on the marking of the goods.

32. Casual goods may be goods accompanying an importer or traveller arriving in Canada, or they may be parcels addressed to individual recipients in Canada, provided they meet the definition of casual goods set out in regulations. Such goods are not intended for sale or for any industrial, occupational, commercial, institutional, or other like use. Further information respecting the entitlement of casual goods to the preferential tariff treatments under a free trade agreement, can be found in Memorandum D11-4-13, Rules of Origin for Casual Goods Regulations.

Low Value Shipments

33. Subsections 6(4) (NAFTA, CCFTA and CCRFTA) and 10(4) (CIFTA) of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations provide for an exemption from the certificate of origin requirements for commercial importations of goods valued at less than CAN$1,600. In such instances, importers must provide as proof of origin a Statement of Origin for such shipments at a time set out in Section 13 of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations (Appendices I and J).

34. For further information concerning the Certificate of Origin and the Statement of Origin for low value shipments, refer to Memorandum D11-4-14, Certification of Origin.

Claiming Preferential Tariff Treatments

35. To claim a preferential tariff treatment under a free trade agreement, the importer must declare on a Form B3, Canada Customs Coding Form, that the importer has in his possession the certificate of origin attesting that the goods originate in a NAFTA country, Israel or another CIFTA beneficiary, Chile or Costa Rica by inserting the following codes in Field No. 14 “Tariff Treatment” on Form B3

  • Code 10 - UST
  • Code 11 - MT
  • Code 12 - MUST
  • Code 13 - CIAT
  • Code 14 - CT
  • Code 21 - CRT

The “Importer Declaration” field on Form B3 must also be completed with the signature of the importer.

36. The declaration of origin field may be used for two purposes. The primary purpose is as stated above, i.e., the declaration of proof of origin, where the importer has in his possession a certificate of origin. The secondary purpose is for certain non-originating textile goods entering Canada under a Tariff Preference Level (TPL). To receive the benefits of the preferential tariff treatment, the importer must have a statement from the exporter or producer of the goods certifying that the goods have met the conditions set out in the Textile and Apparel Goods Remission Order. In such cases, importers must complete Field No. 14 with either Code 10 for the UST, Code 11 for the MT, Code 14 for the CT or Code 21 for the CRT, even though they will not have in their possession a certificate of origin and are not declaring that the goods originate under the rules of origin. The Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement contains no provisions for TPLs. For further information regarding these Orders, refer to Memorandum D11-4-22, Tariff Preference Levels.

37. For further instructions concerning the Form B3, refer to Memorandum D17-1-10, Coding of Customs Accounting Documents.

Refunds

38. Paragraph 13(b) of the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations allows that where an imported good qualifies as an originating good, but no claim for preferential treatment was made at the time of accounting, the importer may, after the goods were accounted for under subsections 32(1), (3), or (5) of the Act, apply for a refund of any excess duties paid as a result of the good not having been accorded preferential tariff treatment. The application should be accompanied by:

  • (a) a written declaration that the goods qualified as originating goods at the time of importation, i.e., that Field No. 14 on Form B2 be completed with the appropriate preferential tariff treatment code;
  • (b) a copy of the relevant certificate of origin; and
  • (c) any other documentation relating to the importation of the goods.

39. Pursuant to paragraph 74(1)(c.1) of the Customs Act, claims for refunds under NAFTA and CCFTA may only be made within one year after the goods were accounted for under subsections 32(1), (3) or (5) of the Custom Act. Pursuant to paragraph 74(1)(c.11) of the Customs Act, claims for refunds under CIFTA and CCRFTA may be made within four years after the goods were accounted for under subsection 32(1), (3) or (5) of the Customs Act. Further information concerning requests for refunds for goods imported from a NAFTA country, Israel or other CIFTA beneficiary, Chile or Costa Rica can be found in Memorandum D6-2-3, Refund of Duties.

Self-Adjustments and Re-determinations

40. Where importers have reason to believe that a declaration of origin is incorrect, they are to make a correction to the declaration and are to pay any duties owing as a result of such a correction. Further information on corrections to the declaration of origin, is found in Memorandum D11-6-6, Self-Adjustments to Declarations of Origin, Tariff Classification, Value for Duty, and Diversion of Goods.

41. For information concerning requests for re-determination of origin of goods imported from a NAFTA country, Israel or other CIFTA beneficiary, Chile or Costa Rica refer to Memorandum D11-6-7, Importers’ Dispute Resolution Process for Origin, Tariff Classification, and Value for Duty of Imported Goods.

Additional Information

42. Further information concerning the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations may be obtained from any regional customs office or from:

Origin and Valuation Division
Trade Programs Directorate
Admissibility Branch
Canada Border Services Agency
Ottawa ON K1A 0L8

Facsimile: (613) 954-5500




Chart 1: Proof of Origin Requirements by Tariff Treatment
Proof of Origin Appendix GT MFN GPT LDC CCCT AUT and NZT UST, MT or MUST (NAFTA) CIAT CT CRT
                       
Commercial Invoice - X X       X        
Form CI 1 Canada Customs Invoice A X X       X        
Form A – Certificate of Origin B     X X X          
Exporter’s Statement of Origin C     X X X          
Form B232 NAFTA Certificate of Origin D             X      
Form B239 CIFTA Certificate of Origin E               X    
Form B240 CCFTA Certificate of Origin F                 X  
Form B246 CCRFTA Certificate of Origin G                   X
Form E669 Declaration of Minor Processing in the United States (CIFTA) H               X1    
Statement of Origin for Commercial Shipments of Less than Cdn$1,6002 I & J             X X X X
Any other documentation indicating the country of origin of the goods - X X       X        

                                                

1 Where CIFTA originating goods are “minor processed” in the United States, Form E669 must be presented in addition to Form B239.

2 For purposes of CCFTA and CIFTA the wording of the Statement of Origin was not negotiated as was done for NAFTA and CCRFTA (Appendices I and J).

Appendix A, Canada Customs Invoice, page 1 of 1

Appendix B, Form A – Certificate of Origin, page 1 of 3

Form A – Certificate of Origin, page 2 of 3

Form A – Certificate of Origin, page 3 of 3

Appendix C

Exporter’s Statement of Origin

I certify that the goods described in this invoice or in the attached invoice No.                          were produced in the beneficiary country of                          and that at least                         % of the ex-factory price of the goods originates in the beneficiary country/countries of                         .

                                                

Name and title

                                                

Corporation name and address

                                                

Telephone and fax numbers

                                                

Signature and date (day/month/year)

Appendix D, North American Free Trade Agreement, Certificate of Origin, page 1 of 2

North American Free Trade Agreement, Certificate of Origin, page 2 of 2

Appendix E, Free Trade Agreemnent – Certificate of Origin, page 1 of 2

Free Trade Agreemnent – Certificate of Origin, page 2 of 2

Appendix F, Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement – Certificate of Origin, page 1 of 2

Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement – Certificate of Origin, page 2 of 2

Appendix G, Certificate of Origin – Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement, page 1 of 2

Certificate of Origin – Canada-Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement, page 2 of 2

Appendix H, Declaration of Minor Processing in the United States (CIFTA), page 1 of 2

Declaration of Minor Processing in the United States (CIFTA), page 2 of 2

Appendix I, NAFTA – Statement of Origin for Commercial Importations of Less Than CAN$1,600, page 1 of 1

Appendix J, CCRFTA – Statement of Origin for Commercial Importations of Less Than CAN$1,600, page 1 of 1

References

Issuing office Origin and Valuation Division
Trade Programs Directorate
Admissibility Branch
Headquarters file n/a
Legislative references Customs Act, Section 35.1, S.C. 1997, c.14, s. 37
P.C. 1997-2024
P.C. 2004-955, September 1, 2004
P.C. 2005-1048, May 31, 2005
Other references D6-2-3, D11-4-3, D11-4-4, D11-4-5, D11-4-6, D11-4-13, D11-4-14, D11-4-22, D11-4-27, D11-5 series, D11-6-6, D11-6-7, D17-1-10, D17-1-21 and D22-1-1
Superseded memoranda D D11-4-2, June 30, 1998